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Timothy and Alfalfa Hay Blog

    Justify Becomes the 13th Triple Crown Winner

    Posted on Jun 12, 2018

    Saturday was a historic day as Justify became the 13th Triple Crown winner with his victory in the Belmont Stakes in Elmont, NY. Conditions were perfect and the track was fast on Saturday as Justify became the second Bob Baffert-trained triple crown winner since American Pharoah ended the 37-year drought in 2015.

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    Topics: News, Horse Nutrition, Race Horse Hay, Hay for Horses, Timothy Hay

    Justify Wins the 2018 Preakness Stakes

    Posted on May 22, 2018

    The second of three races that comprise the Triple Crown ended in another win for Justify this weekend. Conditions at Pimlico Race Course were strikingly similar to those at Churchill Downs earlier this month, with rains leading up to the race, a muddy track, and the addition of heavy fog that made the 9.5 furlongs that much more exciting.

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    Topics: News, Horse Nutrition, Race Horse Hay, Hay for Horses, Timothy Hay

    Justify Wins 144th Kentucky Derby

    Posted on May 7, 2018

    Justify emerged as the winner of an exciting race on Saturday afternoon. The 144th Kentucky Derby was the wettest in history, with a 24-hour precipitation of 3.15” and a muddy track to show for it. Steady rain provided just enough unpredictability to cast a doubt on if this year’s favorite would come through victorious, but Bob Baffert-trained Justify proved worthy. Finishing with a time of 2 minutes 4.20 seconds, Justify was able to edge out Good Magic and Audible by 2 ½ lengths.

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    Topics: Hay for Horses, Race Horse Hay, News, Video

    2015 Western United States Hay Acreage Infographic

    Posted on Feb 4, 2016

    Accounting for about 20% of the national hay area harvested in the United States, the Western US has a climate suited perfectly for the growth of high-quality, nutritious forage. Every day, bales from these states feed animals across the country and around the world. Hay is shipped from ports along the West Coast, making its way to dairies, farms, race horses, and camels across the world.

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    Topics: Hay for Horses, Quality of Forage, Race Horse Hay, Export Hay

    Harvest Update - Alfalfa & Timothy

    Posted on Jun 5, 2015

    As we move into the beginning of the Alfalfa harvest for the Pacific Northwest (PNW), the weather continues to be a key factor in determining the quality and timing of the first cut. The Pacific Southwest (PSW), which is in full-swing, has also been facing weather challenges.Alfalfa_Harvest_Anderson_Hay_Export_Hay

    Growers in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho will begin cutting over the next 1-2 weeks, with some difficulty finding a cutting window due to the erratic and inopportune showers. All growers in the PSW have completed their third cutting harvest with 100% cut and baled, and about 50% of the fourth has been completed. Quality has varied in the PSW, ranging from top quality dairy to low-end feeder hay. Despite the variation in quality, pricing on domestic dairy as well as export continues to be stronger than expected due to untimely showers limiting the green hay. The limited volumes of high-quality hay will continue to be a trend as we move into the hot summer months.

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    Topics: Alfalfa Hay, Hay for Horses, Timothy Hay, Quality of Forage, Timothy, Harvest Update

    Grass Clippings Unsafe for Horses, Stick to Pasture and Hay

    Posted on May 23, 2014

    Resist the Urge to Feed Lawn Clippings to Horses

    Ah…spring! The weather is getting warmer and your lawn is a beautiful, green carpet. At this time of the year, you have to mow the lawn at least once a week, sometimes more frequently, and you generate an immense pile of grass clippings with every cutting. You think – wouldn’t those nice, green, sweet smelling clippings be a wonderful treat for your horse? He eats grass, so why wouldn’t they be good for him? Therefore, when the lawnmower bag is full, you head down to the barn to spoil your horse with a delicious indulgence.

    Stop! Before you dump those bags of clippings into a pile at the barn for your horse to eat, consider the dangers that it poses. Grass clippings are the last thing you want to feed to your horse.

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    Topics: Hay for Horses, Horse Health, Horse Nutrition

    Moving Horses from Hay to Fresh Forage Can Pose Some Risks

    Posted on May 7, 2014

    Is There Danger Lurking for Horses in Lush Spring Pastures?

    Did you know that those lush, early spring pastures can be dangerous for horses?  Over the years, grass breeders have developed cultivars, or types, that rapidly accumulate high levels of sugar, starch, and fructans (together referred to as nonstructural carbohydrates, or NSC). Grasses that have higher NSC are more drought resistant and have faster regrowth after grazing or harvesting. Furthermore, grasses that store more NSC have more calories, stimulate microbial fermentation, and improve nitrogen utilization in the rumens of cattle. Animals prefer forages with higher levels of NSC, which subsequently leads to greater intake and better performance by meat and milk producing animals. While cattle benefit from forages with high NSC, these types of grasses are not necessary good for horses.pastures can be dangerous for horses? Abrupt dietary changes, from hay to fresh forage 

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    Topics: Hay for Horses, Timothy Hay, Quality of Forage, Timothy, Horse Health, Horse Nutrition

    Steamed Hay for Horses

    Posted on Mar 21, 2014

    Does Steaming Make Hay Healthier and Safer for Horses?

    Soaking hay in water for 30 minutes or less is a good way to reduce airborne particles such as dust and mold, making it an effective management strategy for horses with respiratory problems. Soaking also reduces levels of nonstructural carbohydrates in hay, which is essential for horses with metabolic issues. However, soaking also leaches other essential nutrients from hay.

    Steaming hay before feeding is commonly practiced in Europe and is becoming more popular in the U.S. But, not much is known about the effects of steaming on the nutritional quality of forage and if it effectively reduces dust and mold in hay. Fortunately, a study to examine the effects of steaming on hay quality was recently conducted by a team of researchers based in the Department of Animal Science at the University of Minnesota.

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    Topics: Hay for Horses, Quality of Forage, Race Horse Hay, Horse Health, Horse Nutrition

    Timothy Hay: What Cutting is Better for Horses?

    Posted on Feb 19, 2014

    Timothy hay is an excellent source of roughage for equine diets. Horsemen often have to decide if they should purchase the first or second cutting of timothy hay for their horses. Many believe that the nutritional quality of first-cutting timothy hay is inferior to the second cutting. While this may be true in some cases, this assumption is really erroneous if first-cutting hay is harvested from a weed-free field at an early stage of growth before the stem becomes larger and coarser.

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    Topics: Timothy Hay, Hay for Horses, Race Horse Hay, Timothy, Quality of Forage, Horse Health, Horse Nutrition

    Composting for your Horse's Health

    Posted on Feb 13, 2014

    Key Factors for a Successful Compost Pile

    Composting horse manure is beneficial to your horse’s health. A properly managed compost pile will reach temperatures that are high enough to kill fly larvae, which reduces the fly population in the area, and also destroys weed seeds. The high temperature in the compost pile will also wipe out parasites and pathogens, such as viruses and bacteria that could cause diseases in horses.

    There are several things to consider in creating and managing a successful compost pile.

    Pile size. A compost pile that is about seven square feet at the base and at least three feet high will result in the best heating. Heat is generated when organic material decomposes. However, if the pile is too short, the heat will quickly dissipate and will not reach temperatures that are high enough to kill parasites, bacteria, viruses, and weed seeds.

    Airflow. It is important to keep air in the compost pile to minimize odors and achieve high temperatures. Proper airflow will also speed up the decomposition process. Turning the pile at regular intervals (especially during the first few weeks) speeds up decomposition. Turning ensures that air reaches all areas of the pile and thoroughly mixes particles.

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    Topics: Alfalfa Hay, Hay for Horses, Timothy Hay, Blue Grass Hay, Quality of Forage, Timothy, Horse Health